Helpful Tips on How To Write A Self-Assessment

We asked and you answered! Here are some helpful tips for writing your EPARs or self-assessments, from employees like you!

Thumbnail photo of Sue Mosbacher.

"Organization Is Key"

I create a spreadsheet with different tabs for different activities that directly relate to my goals, which I made as measurable as possible. (Write X newspaper articles, complete Y online courses, etc.) I have a tab to track the newspaper articles I write, one for the professional development classes I complete, one to track the classes and events I participate in with my program, and more. This helps me show my supervisor measurable activities I've accomplished to meet each goal. It takes just a moment to open the file, go to the right tab, enter the date and a short description, and then move on with my normal work.

Sue Mosbacher | UC Cooperative Extension

Thumbnail photo of Jim Seibert

"Track Your Goals"

As one evaluation period ends and another begins, I create a Word doc that has categories along with my goals. For example, I am responsible for self-supporting activities so I have that as a category. At the start of each month, I look back through the prior month’s calendar and log those activities on my Word doc. I also have a category called “Learning”. In that bucket, I put the various trainings I attended or new skills I learned. I never know until the end of the eval period which things will be important enough to include in my accomplishments but by updating the doc every month, it enables me to have everything right there at my fingertips come eval time instead of having to remember what I did 11 months ago.

Jim Seibert | Accounting and Financial Services

Thumbnail photo of K. Davis

"Hold Onto Your Thank You Notes"

I've created a folder in my inbox for P4P where throughout the year I'll drop in emails from others that include kudos or a special thank you for my work. When writing my summary of accomplishments I include a quote or two from the compliments received. Anything helpful to the process of writing a self-assessment could be included in the inbox folder. For anything relevant that may not be documented by a formal email communication, I'll write myself a quick email reminder with the details.

Kristin Davis | Human Resources 

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